Tell your story and see!

Tell your story and see!

20 June was World Refugee Day — another of Brandon Stanton’s photos (Humans of New York) was of this cabbie’s story … and part of his story …

“Everyone who sees my resume asks me why I drive a cab. Back in Niger, I was a French Teacher. But the government stopped paying us for a few months, so I decided to quit my job and move to America. That was twelve years ago.

I thought I could teach French here, but I had no idea how hard it would be to get a job without papers. The only place I could find work was a car wash. Back in Niger, kids would wash my car for me. Now all day long I was washing cars for other people. I was very depressed. But I was too embarrassed to go back home …

After the car wash, I became a stock boy. Then, a delivery driver. Five years ago, I got my papers and became a citizen, so now I’m able to work at the airport. At night, and on my days off, I drive a cab. Just this year I graduated from Brooklyn College with a Master’s degree in French. I finished third in my class. Now I think I can become a professor.”

Isn’t this person easier to love … now that we know a little of his story?

Grace and peace, Alan


A Remarkable Book

Learning to draw is a bizarre and wonderful process in the sense that in order to really learn to draw you have to first learn how to see …

Brandon Stanton sees very well through the view finder of his camera. He captures (and releases) photos of “Humans of New York”.

Brandon’s work helps people to see people. To see the wonder and the glory of humanity. Brandon is more than a photographer — he is a spiritual guide. The deepest spirituality is all about seeing — especially how we see one another. That is why Jesus was so passionate about opening the eyes of the blind — and there are none so blind as those who say they see. The other day I listened to a talk by the author Sam Keen. He shared about how it is only possible to love someone when we know their story. Brandon’s work helps us to fall in love with people as a tiny flash of their story becomes known by us.


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